Energy Shift Southeast Asia

Fighting for a fossil-free future

Energy Shift SEA is dedicated to driving the transformation from fossil fuel dependency to a renewable energy-powered landscape across Southeast Asia. Fossil fuels have long powered our region, but their environmental and sustainability costs are undeniable. Our campaign envisions a future where energy needs are met without harming the planet and our people, ensuring a cleaner and brighter tomorrow for all.
Southeast Asia’s fossil fuel dependence

Gas expansion
in Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia now faces massive fossil gas expansion. This not only perpetuates dependence on dirty energy and sacrifices climate ambitions but also worsens energy insecurity and hinders the region’s shift to clean, renewable energy — causing health hazards and loss of livelihoods to local communities as much as it threatens the rich marine biodiversity that lies within the region.

The surge of gas-fired power plants comes with the development of LNG import terminals.

 

106.87 mtpa

Total import capacity of LNG expansion

 

53 LNG import terminal projects

are currently proposed or being built in the region, making Southeast Asia a fossil gas and LNG hub

158 GW Total gas expansion in SEA
Construction of a new coal-fired power plant is seen near communities in the province of Batangas, south of Manila, Philippines. August 12, 2022. Residents, mostly fishermen, continue to struggle with industrial development in the area affecting their rights to health, livelihood, and a clean and safe environment. 

Coal is seen as a cheap source of energy, sufficiently cost-effective at supplying a constant stream of power to meet the minimum demand for electricity in many cities throughout the day. There are 28 coal-fired power plants currently operating throughout the Philippines,

The Philippines remain on the path of burning coal in Southeast Asia, exposing many communities to toxic pollution and endangering marine resources in the country, while other nations are already relying on modern, renewable energy sources for their additional power needs. in the province of Batangas, south of Manila, Philippines. August 12, 2022. Residents, mostly fishermen, continue to struggle with industrial development in the area affecting their rights to health, livelihood, and a clean and safe environment. 

Coal is seen as a cheap source of energy, sufficiently cost-effective at supplying a constant stream of power to meet the minimum demand for electricity in many cities throughout the day. There are 28 coal-fired power plants currently operating throughout the Philippines,

The Philippines remain on the path of burning coal in Southeast Asia, exposing many communities to toxic pollution and endangering marine resources in the country, while other nations are already relying on modern, renewable energy sources for their additional power needs.
Southeast Asia’s fossil fuel dependence

A new detour from renewables

In the last decade, Southeast Asia confronted the major challenge of coal expansion, which, at the time, accounted for 15% of the total coal power in the global pipeline. Resistance to coal gained major wins, particularly in the Philippines, Vietnam, and, to some extent, Indonesia, and Thailand.

Replacing coal in Southeast Asia created the opportunity to move towards mainly renewable energy resources. However, a new detour is undermining this trajectory — fossil gas. Fossil gas and liquefied natural gas (LNG) are falsely touted as a clean alternative to coal. 

Fossil gas emits methane, which leaks into the atmosphere at every stage of its life. Methane traps heat in the atmosphere far more effectively than carbon dioxide if viewed in over 10- to 20-year time scales.

Taking a stand against fossil gas
and advocating for just energy transition
in Southeast Asia

Please fill out this form to connect with us.